Finger Injuries (Subscribe)


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Hand Finger Nail and Tip Injuries eMedicine Plastics

http://www.emedicine.com/plastic/TOPIC309.HTM

As the terminal extension of the fingers and hand, the fingertips are the portions of the upper extremity through which we touch, feel, write, draw, and perform activities of daily living. With the advent of new technology, our dependence on our fingertips for everyday living continues to increase, as we more often surf the internet, program handheld organizers, operate the TV remote control, or research topics in online journals.
Successful treatment of fingertip injuries depends on many considerations, including patient age, sex, occupation, and the anatomy of the fingertip defect. An algorithm to the treatment of fingertip injuries is reviewed below to assist in the management of these injuries.
Wilhelmi & Neumeister 2006

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Hook nail in a pediatric patient

http://www.cma.ca/multimedia/staticContent/HTML/N0/l2/cjs/vol-51/issue ...

Account of reconstruction after a finger tip amputation had caused a hook nail deformity.
Edward J. Harvey, MD Can J Surg, Vol. 51, No. 5, October 2008 396

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Interventions for treating mallet finger injuries Medscape

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/487009

Posted 07/01/2007 HHG Handoll Introduction Date of Most Recent Substantive Amendment: 2004 03 04 Background Mallet finger, also called drop or baseball finger, is where the end of a finger cannot be actively straightened out due to injury of the extensor tendon mechanism. Treatment commonly involves splintage of the finger for six or more weeks. Less frequently, surgical fixation is used to correct the deformity.
Authors' conclusions There was insufficient evidence from comparisons tested within randomised controlled trials to establish the relative effectiveness of different, either custom made or off the shelf, finger splints used for treating mallet finger injury. There was a useful reminder that splints used for prolonged immobilisation should be robust enough for everyday use, and of the central importance of patient adherence to instructions for splint use. There was insufficient evidence to determine when surgery is indicated.
Cochrane Rev Abstract. 2007

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Jammed Finger eMedicine Sports

http://www.emedicine.com/sports/topic55.htm

The layman's term "jammed finger" often refers to injuries that are incurred around the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of the fingers. Although imprecise in its diagnostic accuracy, jammed finger aptly describes a constellation of injuries that are related to varying degrees of axial loading across the PIP joint.
Synonyms and related keywords: sprained finger, dislocated finger, finger sprain, finger dislocation, jammed digit dislocated digit, sprained digit, finger injury, digit injury, finger trauma, proximal interphalangeal joint trauma, PIP joint trauma, proximal interphalangeal joint dislocation, PIP joint dislocation, proximal interphalangeal joint, PIP joint
Author: Michael E Robinson, MD 2007

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Mallet Finger eMedicine Orthopedics

http://www.emedicine.com/orthoped/topic413.htm

Loss of extensor tendon continuity at the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) causes the joint to rest in an abnormally flexed position. This occurs with a laceration to the dorsum of the digit near the DIPJ. Mallet finger describes the condition in which the skin remains closed and the extensor tendon is either forcibly stretched or avulsed from the distal phalanx.
Synonyms and related keywords: baseball finger, dropped finger
Author: Roy A Meals, MD

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Mallet Fracture eMedicine Sports

http://www.emedicine.com/sports/topic72.htm

The term mallet finger has long been used to describe the deformity produced by disruption of the terminal extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint.1, 2, 3 Mallet finger is the most common closed tendon injury that is seen in athletes; this injury is also common in nonathletes after "innocent" trauma. Mallet finger has also been referred to as drop, hammer, or baseball finger (although baseball accounts for only a small percentage of such injuries).
Synonyms and related keywords: baseball finger, drop finger, hammer finger, swan-neck deformity, mallet finger/deformity
Author: Michael E Robinson, MD 2007

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Nail Pathology eMedicine Orthopedics

http://www.emedicine.com/orthoped/topic421.htm

Human fingernails, located on the dorsal aspect of the terminal 40% of the distal phalanx of each finger, are dynamic and physiologically important organs of the hand. Trauma to the fingertip and nail unit remains the most common of all hand injuries. The fingertip is one of the last anatomic structures to be pulled away when closing doors or using saws, machines, chains, or hammers. The long finger is most commonly involved, followed by the ring, index, little finger, and thumb (Hashimoto, 1971). The distal phalanx provides bony support for the nail bed and is fractured in 50% of fingertip injuries. Loss of nail bed integrity can produce a permanent and significantly dysfunctional deformity of the fingernail. Therefore, the fingernail unit must be appreciated and primary anatomic repair of nail bed injuries must be provided whenever possible.
Synonyms and related keywords: nail bed injuries, fingernail injuries, nail deformity, friction avulsions, crush injuries, complex lacerations, traumatic nail deformities, subungual hematoma, simple and stellate lacerations of the nail bed, avulsion injuries, nonadherent nail deformity, split nail deformity, hook-nail deformity, linear ridging deformity, pincer nail deformity
Neumeister, Danikas & Wilhelmi 2004

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